Divers Find Aircraft

Subject: Divers Find WWII Aircraft
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• The find includes historic American aircraft including Douglas SBD, Dauntless dive bombers and a F4U Corsair. Brandi Mueller discovered the planes while scuba diving around five miles from Roi-Namur in the Marshall Islands

A series of incredible photographs showing more than 150 lost World War Two aircraft 130-feet under the Pacific Ocean has been revealed. The stunning images show the planes surrounded by coral and fish as they sit – sometimes vertically – on the sea bed more than seven decades after they were shot down. The find includes historic American aircraft including Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers, F4U Corsair

A series of incredible photographs showing more than 150 lost World War Two aircraft on the seabed of the Pacific Ocean has been revealed. Amazingly many of the planes have remained intact, with only a few broken tail and wings littering the floor. Brandi Mueller, from Cameron, Wisconsin, discovered the planes while scuba diving around five miles from Roi-Namur in the Marshall Islands. She was taking time off to teach diving when she came across the incredible find. Her pictures also show other  Allied aircraft including Helldivers, B-25 Mitchell, Curtiss C-46 Commando and F4F Wildcats.

The find includes historic American aircraft including a Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bomber, which has amazingly remained almost intact.

An incredible color picture show a F4U Corsair, which landed on its propeller with its wings in the sand and has remained upright for years.

A lionfish swims in front of the body of one of the planes while the cockpit of another is covered in coral as hundreds of small fish flit in and out of the wreckage The Douglas SBD Dauntless was manufactured from 1940 to 1944. It is famous for delivering the fatal blows to the Japanese carriers at the Battle of Midway in June 1942 – one of the most decisive battles of World War Two. The Dauntless was replaced by the Curtiss SB2C Helldiver in the early 1940s.  The Helldiver was a larger and faster plane, although delays in production led British and Australian troops to cancel substantial orders.

The stunning images show the World War Two planes surrounded by coral and fish as they sit – sometimes vertically – on the seabed more than seven decades.

Brandi Mueller, from Cameron, Wisconsin, discovered the planes while scuba diving around five miles from Roi-Namur in the Marshall Islands

A Corsair is pictured nose down as two scuba divers take photographs and examine the wreckage, discovered seven decades after it crashed.

One wreckage of a TBF/TBM Avenger is slowly being covered by sand, with only its tail and wing prominently sticking out.

Amazingly, three planes that landed just meters apart have remained intact, with only a few broken tails and wings littering the floor.

The nose and wing of one Avenger has fallen off although it is not known whether this happened before or after impact with the sea bed.

One scuba diver using what appears to be a selfie stick takes a picture of a huge Curtiss C-46 Commando lying ominously on the sea bed.

Hundreds of beautiful blue and yellow fish swim round the nose and wing of a B-25 Mitchell, a twin-engine medium bomber.

The Douglas SBD Dauntless was manufactured from 1940 to 1944. It is famous for delivering the fatal blows to the Japanese carriers at the Battle of Midway in June 1942 – one of the most decisive battles of World War Two.

It is clear that the planes have been left untouched for a long period of time due to the amount of coral growing on them.

Some planes were not as lucky and were destroyed before they reached the sea bed. Above, the tail of two aircraft  lie next to the wing of another.

The size and scale of one of the Dauntless aircraft is shown by a ‘bird’s-eye view’ color image, with a wingspan of just over 12 meters

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